UpTheSaddlers Forum

Here we go again. Why do we make it so hard?


#41

Relatively, a lot of success. And the club showed a little ambition in achieving that success. Since then, nothing, but that has coincided with a complete change in the way football works from a monetary point of view - during which time we’ve stood still, see my original point.

We’re in an era of fickle and shallow support, if you don’t offer hope, then you won’t succeed. People are out there and willing to pay and do what it takes to watch a football team, but only if they feel they’ll be repaid at some point - thats what the hope is. The hope that you’re investing emotionally and financially in a club, and that one day it’ll be worth it. From that perspective, supporting WFC hasn’t been worth it for nigh on 18 years.


#42

How do you achieve that “success”?


#43

Right now? Probably around 16,000 based on how many we took to Wembley.

Back in 2001 - I’d estimate around 30,000 based on how many we took to Cardiff.

We’re going backwards. But like I said, not all of that can be laid at the door of JB, I think similar clubs have stagnated and missed the tv-money boat of spending time in the Championship in the last 10 years.


#44

Bingo. Lots. I can name you 5 family members off the top of my head who were Walsall fans home and away. Now they’re not arsed. My dad did 4 seasons back in the 80’s without missing a game, now he’ll check the score at 5pm and shrug if we lose. It’s really sad.


#45

Plus the children and relatives of those people who no longer attend - if the family legacy of supporting a club dies it can be even more difficult to regain numbers.

How many of us on here don’t have a relative who first took us to a Walsall game?


#46

Dean Smith’s management of the club essentially managed to buy the Board five years’ grace in terms of supporter sentiment. The ‘philosophy’ that actually made a lot of us proud to be Walsall fans wasn’t being driven by the Club as was portrayed in the media, it was clearly all coming from Smith.

Essentially, the current business model seems to be: Chance upon a good manager, ride the optimism that comes from any good results, wait until it goes wrong/manager leaves for a better job, repeat to avoid criticism from supporters.

All the time ensuring we bounce around mid to lower table in League One.

How inspiring…


#48

Yeah he gave it to them on a plate and they chucked it away.

it’s why the Walsall manager job is so difficult and why I was never that harsh on Whitney. It’s not just selecting the team on a Saturday and putting a tactical plan in charge. You are also the face and the fall guy for a board who don’t care about stepping on and moving forward or about the supporters. You almost have to do their job for them as well. That is why the customer experience is so poor. They don’t give a ■■■■. Oh and you have to do all that on a budget.

And while I wish we were winning week in and week out, that is not why I am a Walsall fan. I’m not a Walsall fan because I hope we win the league every year, and I’m amazed at the patience of anyone who is. That is why we (and by that I mean the board) should be doing everything they can to capitalise on every single advantage we have on other teams (and yes, accessibility is one of them, but not the only one) by making that experience the best it can be.


#49

Don’t mention Dean Smith, terrible manager according to know it all Phil.


#50

Agree, and this is the same reason I find the criticism of Gamble and (in particular) Mole maddening. They’re just the public face of a ■■■■ pie, asked to carry the masquerade that we are a progressive, well run club that listens to supporters and has genuine ambitions to return to the Championship.


#51

Everybody should be of no doubt by now what and who the problem is with our club. It’s definitely not Dan Mole.


#52

Luke Leahy?


#53

And once again the same old morons join in and the conversation dies.

Slow clap.


#54

Harsh on TomWFC that, i thought his input was really good.


#55

Maybe if you stopped being an arrogant self righteous so and so you’d have more success on here. El Nombre made fair points but you regard them as nonsense and claim he’s deluded. That’s how you kill a conversation. How Radamel Falcao’s mom by the way? Good yeah? Unblock me on Twitter, miss you hun.


#56

A very good point somewhat missed in my attempts to “kill the conversation”, as it were.

I think we could be doing so much more in regard to the town centre on a match day. One of the main criticisms of the stadium is that it’s nowhere near the tradition catchment areas for Walsall fans. To remedy this I think they could:

  • run a “match day special” shuttle bus. Maybe even stretching to the Bloxwich area. If the ground won’t come to the people bring the people to the ground. Say they brought a bus or even used one of the coaches. A pound a person to and from the ground for each trip. Surely it would pay for itself and hopefully encourage a few more people along on a match day.

  • Have a stall like you suggested selling tickets (at a reasonable price, not the ones they currently charge)

  • Actual advertisements. Posters. There’s literally nothing in the town that even suggests we have a football team!

I like the idea of turning the supporters club into something a bit more appealing too. It had a distinct wiff of old working mens club before it died. I think a real bar with real options in somewhere that is actually nice place to spend time might do wonders.


#57

Given how easy it is to get to the ground via bus or train the football club really does have low visibility in the town centre. Free or subsidised travel with a match ticket might be enough to persuade some, a saving of about £5 (there and back) that they might just end up spending at the stadium.


#59

Makes you wonder why they stay on? and if they are clever enough to realise why they are there, surely they would have walked by now, i can’t think they are there for the money knowing bonzo’s philosophy on paying out.


#60

Me. My parents hate football. Neither of my brothers are bothered either.

I first went with school friends.

It’d be an interesting poll…


#61

Probably because they couldn’t get another job at a professional club, if they did move on they would have to undergo major surgery to implant a backbone.


#62

They alway’s used to run a special bus on match day’s , and that was how i got started as a kid or other wise i probably wouldn’t of bothered , it just made it that much easier to go along to the ground .

The old club shop was close to the town center then also so people used to pop in and get a little bit more involved and interested , and it was just something else to encourage support .